Oil Field Trucking - The Most DANGEROUS Job in the Trucking Industry

Oil Field Trucking – The Most DANGEROUS Job in the Trucking Industry

Source: www.npr.org
Source: www.npr.org

No, the driver of the truck knows whether he/she is tired or not. The supervisor or another member of management and logistics knows that the driver shouldn’t be up for hours and hours, then expected to drive a full shift. Even the management and fleet owners have a responsibility to ensure their drivers are well rested.

This not only causes some delays, and perhaps a few fines, tickets and penalties, but there is more to consider. Truck insurance and premiums can go up. You safety records and ratings can drop. Civil lawsuits and criminal charges can be brought against you.

Source: www.youngquistbrothers.com
Source: www.youngquistbrothers.com

One night of lost sleep can cost you a lot more than one delayed tanker truck! And you know the saying: “Better late than never”!!! So stick with the thought!

So, is there a Way to Better Control Oil Field Trucking?

The simple answer is yes. But implementing the solutions can be much harder. You have the need to get your product to the delivery point.

You and the drivers don’t make money when the truck isn’t moving! Your customers demand their crude to be delivered on time. All this makes sense, but there must be a safe and fair balance.

Source: www.foxoilfield.com
Source: www.foxoilfield.com

Oil field trucking must encourage the adoption of better systems and approach to ensure the safe delivery of the tanker. So how can they?

Invest in better training programs, rethink how scheduling is done, and get with the times. That mean gets automated. With so many tools for running trucking business nowadays, there is no reason why you won’t!

There are so many programs now that can be monitored and can manage the operation. Investing in a good fleet management system will benefit your organization more than just your drivers.

Source: www.washingtonpost.com
Source: www.washingtonpost.com

What is so great about many of these is that they are on-line and can connect virtually. They will offer alerts and other valuable information. Some of them include:

  • Engine and driving data, let you know hours run, service updates, fuel usage and more;
  • Driver behavior, they will let you know the habits of the drivers (or yourself) by recording speeding, swerving, hard braking, and such;
  • GPS, real-time updates of your location, the location of your trucks and trailers tracking or real-time fleet trucking;
  • They can even assist with pre-trip inspection forms and post trip inspections, by electronically filling out inspection forms and submitting these directly to the fleet manager.
Source: www.xtremeoilfield.ca
Source: www.xtremeoilfield.ca

The costs of these are also much more reasonable than you might think. They are practical and can often work with other systems, such as fuel anti-theft and anti-siphoning systems. They help reduce cost, cut down on the paperwork, but most importantly they help make oil field trucking safer.

A Quick Look at Oil Field Trucking Jobs

I have tried to cover a few important aspects, now let’s get a closer look at the oil field trucking job itself.

There are several things to consider before stepping into oil field trucking career, or any other career in a matter of fact! So let’s look at a few that effect oil field trucking, starting with what is most near and dear to all of us.

Source: www.nytimes.com
Source: www.nytimes.com

Oilfield trucking salary is one of the more important things drivers look at when considering driving a tanker. Many companies do hire drivers and pay them a set rate. Others contract it out to owner-operators. They pay is often by the load, similar to hauling any freight, but better. The pay is higher, around 60 thousand or more per year.

As mentioned above this is a very regulated and observed industry. Drilling fields can be very dangerous environments. You’ll need to be well versed on the governmental regulations as well as the company rules, especially those pertaining to safety.

Source: www.vertex.ca
Source: www.vertex.ca

Often the lifestyle of the driver can be very rough. If you’re not used to ‘roughing it’ in small camps, this trucking lifestyle might be a hard adjustment for you. But, the work is physically demanding and getting proper rest tends to be an issue.

I hope you aren’t looking for a regular 9-5 type of truck driving job! You won’t find it doing oil field trucking! The plus side to this is the above mentioned good pay that you will receive as a hazmat driver salary when you compare it with an average truck driver salary. Typically you’ll be away for longer periods of time than if you were a regular truck driver as well.

Source: www.libertyfrac.com
Source: www.libertyfrac.com

Of course, there are other issues to look into but these are a few of the main issues.

A Quick Look at Regular Truck Driving Jobs

I thought it best to give just a real quick comparison of oil field trucking jobs as opposed to regular trucking job. These are based on national averages and whatnot. So I will look at the similar issues, starting with what helps put the food on the table.

Source: www.siouxlandtrailersales.com
Source: www.siouxlandtrailersales.com

So, of course, that will be the pay. Most of the trucking companies pay by the mile. A sitting truck or an empty truck doesn’t earn you anything. A typical newer rookie truck driver can expect to make $30 – $40 thousand per year starting out. Most of the times you need to get some experience under your belt before being picked up with an oil field trucking job.

Source: www.nasolid.com
Source: www.nasolid.com

Well, obviously this next point is going to be very similar for all trucking jobs! There are numerous agencies that oversee this industry, so no matter what you transport, get used to it! However, one key thing to consider is your electronic logbook that is your lifeline!

I mentioned camp life with the oil field trucking; well they might actually still have better sleep quarters than the regular driver. After all, most drivers spend more time in the truck cab and truck mattress than they do in their own bed!

Comments

comments

< Page 2 / 3 >